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Savannah Guthrie on Having a ‘Chill’ Birth Plan: ‘If I Need a C-Section, I’ll Be Totally Okay with That’

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Justin Coit

Savannah Guthrie is almost ready to break her most important story of the year: welcoming her second child.

The Today show co-anchor sat down with Fit Pregnancy and Baby for their November cover, dishing on life at home with husband Michael Feldman and their 2-year-old daughter Vale as they await baby number two.

Something Guthrie, 44, isn’t concerned about having to control? How her little boy will arrive.

“I had a low-lying placenta with Vale, so about nine days before my due date, my doctor recommended a c-section. The whole experience was just fantastic. Afterward, I was high on life — and probably a couple of painkillers,” the mom-to-be jokes. “This time, when I said, ‘Do you think I’ll have a c-section again?’ the doctor said, ‘Let’s talk about it when it gets closer.’ ”

“And I like that about my doctor. He’s real chill,” she adds. “If I need a c-section, I’ll be totally okay with that. And if I have this baby the old-fashioned way, that’s cool too.”

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Justin Coit
Justin Coit

The day Guthrie found out she was pregnant again was definitely one to remember.

“I woke up very early in the morning and took a test, but it didn’t turn positive right away. I set it aside, sat at my computer, and just tried not to collapse. I kept thinking, ‘I know how blessed I am, and what’s meant to be is meant to be,’ ” the working mom explains. “Then, five minutes later, I glanced at the test again and saw two lines. They were faint, so I turned on every light in the house. Then I took another test, and another, and then I finally woke up my husband and showed him. He was so excited!”

Guthrie shares that her can-do, no-expectations attitude has also helped her have a positive perspective in the past about whether she’d be able to have children at all.

“I came to motherhood so late in life. When I got pregnant with Vale, I won’t say I’d given up hope, but I didn’t let myself think about how sad I would be if it never worked out. So when Vale came along, I was overjoyed,” she says.

“And to this day, if it was only Vale, it would not be ‘just Vale,’ ” Guthrie continues. “She is beyond every dream, the icing on the cake, plus the gold medal, plus everything. But at the same time, I wanted to try to give her somebody to do life with.”

Justin Coit
Justin Coit

When asked whether she’d be going for the epidural, Guthrie has no problem admitting that while she respects women who don’t, the pain associated with that path isn’t for her.

“Oh, 100 percent,” she says with a laugh. “Is there anything about me that suggests I have the internal fortitude to withstand birth without a little bit of help? But my hat’s off to women who do. My sister-in-law did with both of her children. She’s an amazing superwoman athlete. And I know that I am not.”

The reason Guthrie found out her second child’s sex this time around has a lot to do with keeping Vale’s a secret — and wanting to give her daughter some inside info.

“It was a surprise to find out with Vale in the delivery room. People had convinced us it was a boy, and in my mind, it was a boy. So when the doctor said, ‘It’s a girl,’ I shrieked as though he had said, ‘It’s a giraffe,’ ” she jokes. “I was truly shocked but so happy.”

“I couldn’t muster the restraint this second time. And we wanted to tell Vale as much as possible. We wanted to say, ‘You’re going to have a little baby brother!’ ”

Justin Coit
Justin Coit

Not surprisingly, Guthrie and Feldman don’t have a name picked out yet — but only because they don’t want to solidify anything without meeting their little guy first.

“We have a name in mind, but we’re not committing. We are big believers in looking at the baby to see if the name fits. With Vale, we thought we were having a boy, though we did have a girl’s name too.”

“When we saw her, we were like, ‘That’s not her name. She’s too pretty for that name.’ It was a boyish name. We had never planned on Vale, that’s just a name I had always liked. There in the hospital I said, ‘For the next hour, let’s pretend her name is Vale and we’ll try it on for size.’ And we loved it. It fit her. She was serene.”