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Leigh-Allyn Baker on Why She Chose to Tell Her Son's Dyspraxia Story: I Want to Make It 'Normal' for Him

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Tonda Thomas of Murray

Will & Grace alum and Good Luck Charlie star Leigh-Allyn Baker opens up about motherhood and her son’s daily battle with dyspraxia in an exclusive five-part PEOPLE series. (Read part 1 here, part 2 here and part 3 here.)

Leigh-Allyn Baker is speaking out about her son’s life with developmental disorder dyspraxia, but know it’s not really her story to tell.

“I struggle with the fact that it’s [about] Griffin, and should I be speaking out about something that’s his, not mine,” Baker says of her 8-year-old son.

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Source: Leigh-Allyn Baker/Instagram

The Good Luck Charlie actress has opened up to PEOPLE ahead of an upcoming Facebook Live chat with Dyspraxia Foundation USA about how her family – including husband Keith Kauffman and 4-year-old son Baker James – has come together to make sure Griffin is getting the attention he needs to thrive.

Dyspraxia typically affects coordination, among other things. For Griffin, it also has a co-morbidity of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD.

Though once hesitant to talk about Griffin, Baker, 45, says she’s hoping by bringing national attention to dyspraxia – which, though common, often goes undiagnosed – he feels more comfortable about his limitations.

RELATED VIDEO: Will & Grace Alum Leigh-Allyn Baker on Learning Her Son Has Dyspraxia

“I feel the more normal I make this, the easier it is to accept and it becomes normal to him,” she explains. “My priority is what’s best for him.”

She adds, “When you say dyslexia, everyone knows what you’re talking about. I would like to be able to say dyspraxia and have everyone know what you’re talking about. There needs to be understanding of how everyone’s brain really works differently and how if you’re not afraid to acknowledge it and get the proper therapies, it can really make a difference.”