People

Stay Connected

Subscribe

Advertise With Us

Learn More

Skip to content

Archive

The 'Confession' That Wasn't

Posted on

Even by the sordid standards of the O.J. Simpson saga, it seemed like a new low: a book and interview deal in which Simpson would reveal how he might have carried out the 1994 slayings of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman, the brutal crime of which a jury acquitted him in 1995. (A civil trial later found him liable for $33.5 million in damages.) The deal, with FOX Broadcasting and ReganBooks, left the victims’ families reeling. “I felt,” says Nicole’s sister Tanya Brown, “like I was living it all over again.”

At least not for long. After a public outcry, FOX and Regan (both owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation) announced on Nov. 20 that both the book, If I Did It, and the interview had been scrubbed. “This was an ill-considered project,” said Murdoch. “We are sorry for any pain this has caused the families.”

Why would Simpson, 59, now living near Miami, agree to put his name on a book that publisher Judith Regan described as tantamount to a confession? “Perhaps for the money,” says his friend Delvon Campbell. “He’s got bills to pay.” His attorney Yale Galanter says Simpson’s earnings on the book (reportedly $3.5 million) were to go directly to his children Justin, 18, a freshman at Florida State University; and Sydney, 21, a sophomore at Boston University. “His main motivation for doing this was for their protection,” says Galanter, but even he isn’t sorry the deal’s off. “I cannot think of a project,” he says, “in poorer taste.”