People

Stay Connected

Subscribe

Advertise With Us

Learn More

Skip to content

Archive

Picks and Pans Main: Books

Posted on

This Is How You Lose Her

by Junot Díaz |

REVIEWED BY KIM HUBBARD

STORIES

For the Dominican immigrants in Díaz’s searing, irresistible new stories, love is like the promise of America: a siren call, a path to self-transformation, a dream you can’t stop chasing even though (thanks to your faults and hers) it always lets you down. There’s the recurring character Yunior, a young lothario so besotted with women he “could fall in love…over an expression, over a gesture,” yet his cheating drives them all away. There’s Yasmin, who washes sheets in a hospital laundry by day and shares her nights with a married factory worker, ever alert for signs that he’s missing the wife he left in Santo Domingo. (“You must not think on these things,” a friend tells her. “This is…how in part we all survive here.”) It’s a harsh world Diaz conjures but one filled also with beauty and humor and buoyed by the stubborn resilience of the human spirit. For better and worse, as one of his characters puts it, “people’s hopes go on forever.”

BY THE AUTHOR OF…

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

by Jonas Jonasson |

REVIEWED BY HELEN ROGAN

NOVEL

We meet him on the lam from the old-folks home, but the hero of this witty caper-a bestseller in Europe-turns out to have played a major role in history. He’s crossed paths with everyone from Stalin to LBJ and helped develop the atomic bomb. So why is he creeping around Sweden with an elephant, a dog and assorted lowlifes? If you’re not deterred by the words “Swedish humor,” you’ll enjoy finding out.

Why Have Kids?

by Jessica Valenti |

REVIEWED BY JUDITH NEWMAN

NON-FICTION

Why indeed? Having children purely for love (instead of, say, cheap labor) is a relatively recent phenomenon and has ratcheted up expectations of how parents should feel. Thanks to the media and the vast mother-advice-giving industry, we mostly feel inadequate. For mothers like Valenti, who felt guilty admitting impatience at the drudgery and boredom that constitutes much of parenting, this book may be a revelation. And a comfort.

Kept in the Dark

by Penny Hancock |

REVIEWED BY JOSH EMMONS

THRILLER

In Hancock’s debut novel, a pretty, middle-aged voice coach named Sonia invites a teen boy into her house on the Thames-and decides not to let him go. Writing about her crime in a calm, measured voice, Sonia comes across as a blend of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca and John Fowles’s The Collector, a woman as smart as she is unstable. Her story isn’t creepy enough to keep you up at night, but it casts an appropriate shadow for summer’s end.

COMMENTS? WRITE TO KIM HUBBARD: bookseditor@peoplemag.com