People

Subscribe

Stay Connected

Subscribe

Advertise With Us

Learn More

Skip to content

Archive

Mail

Posted on

Most correspondents were happy to learn that Loni Anderson has found romance anew (PEOPLE, NOV. 8) after being dumped by husband Burt Reynolds, but several found fault with us for not paying homage on our cover to the late master of the macabre, Vincent Price.

LONI ANDERSON

All I can say is, hooray for Loni Anderson and her new beau, Geoffrey Brown! I could never understand what a gorgeous, classy lady like Loni could see in that overstuffed, unbelievably arrogant buffoon, Burt Reynolds.

YVONNE M. RUSSMAN, Gaithersburg, Md.

I’m so happy for Loni! She deserves happiness after all the grief Burt put her through. I say more power (of attorney) to her.

MARY BACKER DAVIS, Ripon, Calif.

Let’s see…Loni has found a new love, L.A. lawyer Geoffrey Brown, and Burt has found a new love, Pam Seals, a Tampa cocktail-lounge manager. But more important, Geoffrey cooks, and Pam is “such a good cook that Burt is getting fat.” The real problem in this five-year marriage was that they didn’t need a marriage counselor, they needed a good chef!

SUE LEVINE, North Brunswick, N.J.

I see Loni’s PR machine is still in full swing. She hasn’t convinced me of her faultlessness in the marital break, but she has become a master at shifting the blame to Burt. He’s better off without her.

S. CARPENTER, Orlando

VINCENT PRICE

Vincent Price was a legend, respected for all his accomplishments, and I feel that he deserved more recognition and appreciation than your too-brief tribute. He deserved the cover.

MICHELLE ROONEY, Albany, N.Y.

I can’t believe Loni Anderson’s “new love” was on the cover instead of the late actor Vincent Price. A lifetime of talent edged out by Loni’s latest date. Who decides your cover subjects anyway?

JACKIE J. PRADO, Kamiah, Idaho

LISA BRYANT

The tragic death of a woman as talented as Lisa Bryant is very sad. The inference that the housing of officers and enlisted personnel on temporary duty in the same military “hotel” was partly to blame is sadder still. The reality of today’s military is that, as in civilian businesses, many enlisted men and women have as much education and as many skills as their officers. It appears that the real issues here are gun control and alcohol abuse, same as they are in most other murders.

JOAN FANNIN, Albuquerque

I have been a resident of Fayetteville, N.C., since 1986 and find your description of our city insulting. We certainly have our share of strip joints, but that’s very common for a city next door to a population of young soldiers. Also, the term “Fayette-nam” was not given to Fort Bragg because of humidity. It was coined because of the large population of Vietnamese girls working in clubs in the early ’70s. Fayetteville for too long has been blamed for the tragedies that occur at Fort Bragg, and I’d like it known that the scene of the crime is at least 10 miles from the city.

KAY F. COLE, Fayetteville, N.C.

CAROLYN WALTERS

How sad our society has become when jurors like Carolyn Walters, either out of fear or ignorance, use the excuse that “People were caught up in a frenzy” to fail to convict Damian Williams of attempted murder. We as humans are “caught up” in a variety of emotions every day of our lives. This doesn’t give us the right to smash a brick into the head of another human being. Edmund Burke said something in 1795 that still holds frightfully true today: “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

THOMAS P. YOUNG, Napa, Calif.

I am a working-class white male raised with, working with and closest of friends with members of many minorities. I am not a racist simply because I am disgusted with the Reginald Denny verdict. It is as outrageous to believe that Los Angeles will “heal” following the unpunished beating of Denny as it was to believe that justice was served by the paltry sentences given the officers who beat Rodney King. I believe there is good and bad everywhere, and in my estimation some very bad men, both black and white, have not truly paid for their crimes. Both the King and Denny trials stunk of manipulation, intimidation and discrimination and may well be a more glaring example of this country’s problems than the beatings themselves.

STERLING ROME, New York City