People Staff
September 11, 1978 12:00 PM

No Stone Unturned

As TV’s Bionic Woman, Lindsay Wagner leaps buildings, outraces autos and kayoes Caterpillar tractors. But nonbionic, it’s a different story. While filming the CBS-TV movie The Outlander (she plays a country doctor) in California’s Sierra mountains, Wagner, 29, tripped so often on hilly trails (and simultaneously lost her temper) that a crew member was assigned to walk in front of her and remove the most perilous sticks and stones from her path.

Wishing on a Star

Trust Omar Sharif to be different. The Egyptian actor’s latest desire: “I wish I were impotent.” Why? “I’ve had enough of women. Who wants to go through all that anymore?” Omar, 46, would also like to fold his tent and silently steal away. “All I want to do now is be anonymous,” he sighs, “to be able to go out at night and not be recognized.” With many more movies like his last blooper (Crime and Passion), he may find at least 50 percent of his wishes coming true.

An Unharried Woman

Having gone through the likes of comedian Peter Sellers, record mogul Lou Adler, rocker Rod Stewart and Foghat drummer Roger Earl, Swedish actress Britt Ekland is crowing that she’s found someone new—herself. “Thank God, I’ve discovered that I can live by myself as a woman,” proclaims Britt, 34. “I became known as someone connected with a new man, not someone doing a new film [her last was Slavers] or a new play.” Now she insists she’s “not interested in getting involved with anyone—I mean it very sincerely.” But holding the line may be hard. Britt also admits that “sex is as important as food and drink.”

A Bridge Too Far

Polls may show that the public is forgiving Teddy Kennedy for Chappaquiddick, but his fellow politicians apparently have not forgotten. Massachusetts Governor Mike Dukakis was asked at a press conference whether he thought Kennedy’s appearance at the national governors’ convention in Boston was a first step toward a presidential bid. Dukakis responded, “We’ll look at that bridge…”—and then smothered his face with his hand.

So Moved

Maybe it was the pressure of success, or maybe he was overtired. But just after Howard Jarvis, 75, California’s crusty tax revolt firebrand, told a Chicago TV audience what made him tick (“Anyone who gets to this age and does more for the people of California than anyone else—well, it’s a fantastic way to finish out your life”), he broke down and cried on camera. His interviewer, Sandi Freeman, was so moved she threw her arms around Jarvis and kissed him. Speculated Freeman later, “He’s proud of what he’s done, and I guess he sees this as his last shot.”

Furthermore

•Perhaps even Burt (Hooper) Reynolds should start worrying about John Travolta. At an Actors and Others for Animals benefit auction in Hollywood, Travolta’s black Grease T-shirt brought $310—while Burt’s Semi-Tough shirt garnered a semi-so-so $90.

•At an Episcopal log chapel tucked beneath Wyoming’s Tetons, worshipers are traditionally asked during the service to identify themselves. There are no exceptions, one recent visitor learned. When his turn came, he stood up and said, “I’m Jimmy Carter from Plains, Georgia, but I’m living for a while in Washington, D.C.”

•When not filming American Bandstand or $20,000 Pyramid, 48-year-old teenager Dick Clark unwinds with a singular hobby: repairing vintage hubcaps.

•The eight-month trial separation of presidential aide Hamilton Jordan and wife Nancy is ending. They’ve decided to get a divorce.

•In an incident unrelated to, but oddly forecast by, Crystal Gayle’s hit single Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue, filming was postponed for 10 days on the Gang! movie set in Venice, Calif. when blue-eyed star Robby (One on One) Benson, who plays a Chicano, developed severe eye irritation from wearing brown contact lenses.

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